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"Will the real John Doe please stand up?"


"To Tell The Truth" is the classic game show that features three contestants all claiming to be the same person. Following the host's introduction of the contestants, an affidavit is read describing the life, activities and/or unique experiences of the individual who all three contestants are claiming to be. The featured celebrity panel then asks the three contestants questions, in hopes of trying to determine which one is telling the truth and which two are lying. Following the question session, each panelist has to vote for the contestant he thinks really is the person described in the affidavit. Wrong guesses are worth money to all three contestants, who split the winnings equally.

As a new feature, the audience will also participate in the game by guessing which contestant is telling the truth. They will be polled electronically at the conclusion of each round.

Originally hosted by Bud Collyer, "To Tell The Truth" was broadcast on CBS from 1956 through 1967 and held various time slots, primarily during prime time. The program was also seen in daytime on CBS from June 1962 to September 1968. Regularly featured panelists included Polly Bergen, Kitty Carlisle, Ralph Bellamy, Tom Poston, Orson Bean and Peggy Cass. Other featured panelists included Johnny Carson, Bill Cullen and Don Ameche.

In 1968, the series left CBS and entered syndication the following year. "To Tell The Truth" remained in syndication until 1977. Hosting duties were taken over by Garry Moore and later by Bill Cullen and Joe Garagiola. Another syndicated version of the game show series was produced during 1980 to 1981 with Robin Ward as host. In 1991, another version of the game show aired on NBC which was first hosted by Gordon Elliott and later by Lynn Swann and lastly by Alex Trebek.

"To Tell The Truth" was originally produced by Mark Goodson and Bill Todman. Part of the Mark Goodson catalog, the show was a hit for over thirty years in both network as well as syndicated runs and is considered one of the most valuable game show franchises in the history of television.